More News on Stolen Papyri from the Egypt Exploration Society

The Egypt Exploration Society has posted an update to last week’s announcement regarding papyri stolen from the EES and allegedly sold to Hobby Lobby by Professor Dirk Obbink. The updates discuss the EES manuscripts that have made their way to the collection of Andrew Stimer. These include the following, which Mr. Stimer intends to return to the EES:

The EES also notes that a couple of manuscripts on the list of papyri with dubious origins are actually safe and sound in EES holdings and have been assigned to editors:

It seems that Scott Carroll had only gotten hold of images of these unpublished papyri and not the manuscripts themselves. I will update the list accordingly. See the full EES announcement here:

https://www.ees.ac.uk/news/missing-papyri-two-updates

This entry was posted in Dirk Obbink, Oxyrhynchus Papyri, Scott Carroll. Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to More News on Stolen Papyri from the Egypt Exploration Society

  1. D. Bradnick says:

    “It seems that Scott Carroll had only gotten hold of images of these unpublished papyri and not the manuscripts themselves.” Or, at any point, were these manuscripts outside of the possession of EES and made their way back into the collection?

    If that’s not the case, then based on Carroll’s 2013 University of the Nations presentation, it seems plausible that there are other early manuscripts of Luke floating around.

    At approximately min. 39:30, he seemingly passes around two physical portions of the gospel of Luke. Given what we know now, there is little reason to doubt Carroll on the existence of these items–although there is significant reason to doubt his credibility on other points.

    • Anon. says:

      Those are probably paper facsimiles mounted in glass. Carroll showed e.g. P52 in a facsimile mounted in glass in one of his presentations on YouTube. It’s a bit unlikely that he would export valuable papyrus originals to circulate at an event like this where they could easily be damaged or go missing. There was also that African Facebook page you mentioned to Brent, where a student of his had put up pictures of Stimer (?) papyri in facsimiles between sheets of glass. It’s apparently something Carroll often did for didactic purposes.

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